How much does it cost to fulltime

The question has been asked on one of the forums and so it has got us thinking. Its so hard to know how to answer the question. If it was rephrased and read how much does it cost to live then the answer becomes easier to answer.

I guess though if we restrict ourselves to fulltiming in a motorhome/rv our answer has to be about £300 per month. This covers our site fees, our electricity and our rates.

Prior to going fulltime we had mortgage costs of £800 per month, electricity of £100 per month and our rates were also about £100 per month. We would spend about £50 on site fees per month as well.

So I guess we save £750 per month by fulltiming. You could then argue though that in the past houses have gone up in value so if you sell your house that saving would almost be wiped out by losing that increase. So in reality the cost of fulltiiming is really hard to quantify

Three dongle for internet access

I mentioned in an earlier post that I was impressed with the Three signal at The cedar’s hotel, Stowmarket where the wedding was. I decided to take advantage of it and got up at 5.30am to sort the photographs and get them online. The album was 38megs in size and Three handled it fantastically, if you want to have a look click on this link

I think Three have really take the mobile internet market by storm. T Mobile are about to link up with them and then they will be a real force. Vodaphone seems to have lost direction at the moment if our dongle from them is anything to go by

Busy day

The day started with a trip to the MOT centre and the car flew through the test – fantastic. It was a case of a quick breakfast and then off to the wedding.

After meeting Jo, the bride at her home it was off to the church, and what a church it is. Just outside Stowmarket you leave the road and crive down a half mile track to get there. It was a beautiful wedding and I got some great shots. Stewart, the groom and Jo invited me to the wedding breakfast and then in the evening I set up a studio for the evening guests.

After such a long day I decided to stay at the hotel, which is where I am now. The Three dongle I am using is fantastic here and is really flying. It is usually good but this is the best I have ever had it

Bad weather

It was awful yesterday. At about 3pm it started to rain and it did not stop until midnight and wow was it heavy. Off to Essex today to photograph some portraits and then a wedding tomorrow

10 000th post

I have just made my 10 000th post on MHF here I have made a couple of posts on MHF over the past few hours that are relevent to fulltiming:-

I was talking to a friend (made via MHF) earlier this evening about the next few weeks.

We are currently in Yorkshire having come here to have the RV serviced by the MHF RV mechanic.

We are planning to nip down to another MHF friend’s sons wedding in Devizes shortly.

Then its upto Newcastle to another MHF friend’s dog show to take photographs of the show.

Then its over to Southport to spend the first bank holiday in August with 50 MHFers on the seafront, then a couple of weeks later its over to Tollerton for another weekend with MHFers.

Its then a long drive to the MHF gathering at The Shepton Mallett show and then to Brean for the MHF follow on rally.

We love our life and I guess at the moment we have MHF to thank for arranging our diary for us.

Prior to joining MHF neither Shona nor myself knew anyone from outside of the UK. Now we have friends all over Europe and they – you are great.

For us its the members of MHF that its all about but to Nuke we thank him for building the initial house we all share on the internet.

Thanks for spotting it prior to the 10 000th Catherine and Steve to give me the opportunity to make this post. Its a bit scary after the problems with one of the threads that has hit a high number. Hopefully I will still be here as I hit the 10001st post Laughing Laughing hopefully not Crying or Very sad Crying or Very sad

and

I winder what fulltiming actually means? After all if we take it literally then we all fulltime, some live fulltime in a motorhome, some fulltime in a house.

When we are young and thinking about buying a house no one says that you must save up £100 000 pounds as a safety net in case it goes belly-up, although of course the building societies are not far off asking for that sort of deposit now.

Of course used generically the term within motorhome circles means living in your motorhome. A year ago I said that fulltimers had a secret and Sallytrafic asked me what it was. I could not answer him since I had not worked it out at that point and I still haven’t quite got around to putting it into words but the following is certainly very much part of it, taken from something I read on MHF yesterday but have read before

TWO GLASSES OF WINE

When things in your life seem almost too much to handle, when 24 hours in a day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and the 2 glasses of wine…

A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly, he picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls.

He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else He asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with a unanimous ‘yes.’

The professor then produced two glasses of wine from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar, effectively filling the empty space between the sand. The students laughed.

‘Now,’ said the professor, as the laughter subsided, ‘I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things; your family, your children, your health, your friends, and your favourite passions; things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.’

The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, and your car. The sand is everything else; the small stuff.

‘If you put the sand into the jar first,’ he continued, ‘There is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls. The same goes for life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you.’

‘Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out to dinner. Play another 18. Do one more run down the ski slope. There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal. Take care of the golf balls first; the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.’

One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the wine represented.

The professor smiled. ‘I’m glad you asked. It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for
a couple of glasses of wine with a friend.’

Fulltiming has certainly helped me get my priorities in order

Thought I would paste them here as they are very relevant to us. I think its very important to have a plan rather than to just wander and also to know why you are fulltiming.

Credit Crunch

For weeks now the newspapers have been full of articles on the credit crunch. I have also noticed a rapid increase on the forums of people looking at fulltiming. I am sure the two must be linked. It seems there are a lot of people out there cheesed off with the increased cost of living and are looking for a better way.

Fulltiming has certainly been beneficial to us but whether it would work for everyone is a different question.

Fulltiming with a child

The following is a copy of an answer we put onto a forum where a member asked about fulltiming with a young child and what you would do if it did not work out

We have exactly the same age daughter as you – she will be three in December. Possibly we are older than you – mid forties and we have already brought up our three eldest children who are early 20s.

We fancied fulltiming 10 years ago but with three teenagers, in our opinion it was a no no. I firmly believe that a child is no more a child after he/she is 12 and is on the road to being an adult. From that point they are building life long friends and if they have been used to living in a house to then wrench them away from it would be wrong. In Hannah’s case she raises another interesting question – could an estranged father actually stop the mother taking a child on an extended trip around Europe? Obviously if a child sees his/her father every week it again would be unfair but sometimes a fathers sees a child twice a year but still wants to control his ex’s life.

When our eldest three all told us they were leaving home in Oct 2006 we saw our chance and put the house up for sale. Prior to that we had been struggling along with a business that had gone bad and life was a real chore.

During the last couple of years there have been major things go wrong. I got within 24 hours of dying – thats what the surgeon told me anyway, having had a hernia explode but do you know what we survived.

The most important thing is to continue to develop your life. We have to work but we do not need so much money now so the pressure is not so great. What we can do is see our daughter every day rather than for a few minutes after work and a few minutes before our work. We have started a few blogs and a young/tiny forum to do with home schooling as this is something we are considering.

What I would suggest is to go into the council waiting list. I got this tip from a friend who sadly died a while a go. He had a heart attack a few years earlier and was no longer able to work. He had a mortgage on his house but was no longer able to pay it. Being over 60 he was deemed vulnerable, as is someone with a child. He sold his house, banked the equity and the council gave him an OAP bungalow. He said for the first time in years he felt relaxed and had quality of life and thats what its all about “Quality of life”